The Best Varieties of Pole Beans to Grow in Your Garden

Pole Beans

French beans, String beans and Snap beans, better-known Green beans, are the unripe fruit and the enclosing pods of different varieties of bean plants. They are harvested and consumed with their protective pods, usually before the seeds within have fully matured.

Green beans are classified by growth habit into two major groups, bush beans and pole beans.

  • Bush beans are short plants, they grow to about 2 feet in height, They typically reach full growth and produce all of their crops in a short period of time, then stop producing.
  • Pole beans also known as runner bean, The vine can grow to 3 m (9 ft) or more in length. which must be supported by poles or trellises.

Types of Pole beans usually grown in the home garden:

Pole Beans

Blue Lake Pole: Is a robust producer, it produces stringless, round and long straight pods about 6".

Blue Lake beans are known for being juicy and sweet, They can be eaten fresh. And are a good choice for canning or freezing.

It take 63 days to reach Maturity, the planting season is Late spring to early summer.

Pole Beans

Kentucky Blue Pole: This variety of pole beans combine the best of Blue Lake and Kentucky Wonder.

Kentucky Blue Pole beans grow to be round, smooth and straight. The dark green pods have a sweet flavor and grow to be 8-9.5" long. The vines are strong and produce a big harvest, over a long season.

It takes between 58-60 days to reach Maturity, the planting season is Late spring/early summer.

Pole Beans

Kentucky Wonder Pole: This variety of pole beans has been popular since the mid 1800s. This old-timer is brown-seeded and a favorite because of its exceptional productivity, flavor, and wide adaptability.

Kentucky Wonder Pole grow to be approximately 7-9" long. stringless and slender when harvested young. The Pods are thick and meaty.

It takes between 55-65 days to reach Maturity, the planting season is Late spring/early summer.

Pole Beans

Scarlet Runner bean: One of the oldest runner beans in existence. It was already a well-known variety of beans in 1735 according to The Gardener’s Dictionary by English botanist Philip Miller.

Scarlet Runner seeds can be directly seeded into warm soil after the last spring frost. Space your seeds 2-4 inches apart, and 1 inch deep. as the plant grow it will need to be supported with trellis to keep the vines off the ground.

It takes between 65 days to reach Maturity, the planting season is Late spring/early summer.

Pole Beans

Golden Gate Beans: Have large, flattened, sunny yellow pods, which set off nicely by the vigorous, dark green plants. Making it easy to see and harvest the bean pods.

Golden Gate Beans pods grow to be approximately 25cm (10")long. They are tasty and stringless even when they mature, you can enjoy them sautéed in butter for a melt-in-your-mouth side dish.

Golden Gate Beans produces huge yields. And it takes between 10-12 weeks to reach Maturity, the planting season is Late spring/early summer.

Pole Beans

Algarve French Climbing Beans: There flavor is fabulous, and give huge yields, and you can harvest them earlier than most other types of beans.

This variety of beans is very resistant to Common Bean Mosaic Virus. Algarve Climbing Bean have a vigorous and robust vine, it can grow up to 6 to 7 feet long over the course of the season.

Algarve Climbing Bean pods can grow to reach up to 10 inches long and 1 inch wide. They are Completely stringless.


How to Care for Roses in Summer


Shrub Roses look fabulous in the early summer, they become more colorful, more lush, and have more leaf growth. But, even the easy to care for Shrub Roses need some maintenance for them to stay healthy in the heat of summer.

Here’s what you need to know:
1- You'll need to water around the base of the rose deeply and frequently.
2- If your roses aren’t looking rosy, it’s time to prune your plants. Not like the major cutting back that's done in late winter, but a lighter prune to encourage new growth.
3- Fertilize your Roses once every 4 to 6 weeks, all through the summer, with Miracle-Gro Rose Plant Food
4- Apply Chelated Iron to your soil if the leaves start turning yellow. 
5- Trim faded roses to stimulate plant growth and encourage new blooms.
6- Clean up the debris under and around the plant, such as spent blooms, trimmings and dead leaves. These can incourage fungal diseases such as powdery mildew and blackspots.


Easy Ways to Maintain a Healthy Lawn in the Summer

Lawn Care Tips

Summer heat can take a toll on Lawns. Especially if you mow too low or ignore early signs of pests. Your lawn grass can become lifeless or die in small or large patches. Keep your lawn grass looking at its best all summer long by using these tips.

1- Make sure you are not using more water, then your lawn needs. By placing several empty jars on your lawn, after you water your lawn. Measure how much water in each can to know too much water you use, and if you are watering the lawn evenly. 2 to 3 inches of water every week, should be sufficient.

2- Fertilize the lawn every for to six weeks using a Slow Release Lawn Food.

3- Apply a Pre-emergent weedkiller to your lawn in early spring to prevent crabgrass and problem weeds all season long.

4- Mow your lawn regularly as soon as the new growth reach more than 1/2 inch. For varieties like Tifgreen Bermuda Grass you should mow at ½-1 inch, and common Bermuda grass at the 1-1 ½ inches mark.



The Best Varieties of Bush Beans to Grow in Your Home Garden

bush beans

French beans, String beans and Snap beans, better-known Green beans, are the unripe fruit and the enclosing pods of different varieties of bean plants. They are harvested and consumed with their protective pods, usually before the seeds within have fully matured.

Green beans are classified by growth habit into two major groups, bush beans and pole beans.

Bush beans are short plants, they grow to about 2 feet in height, They typically reach full growth and produce all of their crops in a short period of time, then stop producing.
Pole beans produce a twisting vine, which must be supported by poles or trellises.


How to Plant Knockout Roses

knockout rose

Knockout Roses are a less susceptible to diseases variety of roses, bred by William Radler.

When to plant knockout roses:

knockout rose

You can successfully plant knockout roses in the U.S. in zones 5 through 11. And the best time to start planting knockout roses is in the fall or in the early spring.

Where to plant knockout roses:

knockout rose

Knockout Roses need at least 6 to 8 hours of sunlight each day to grow big and healthy, so choose a sunny spot in your garden to plant your rose bush.

How deep do you plant knockout roses:

knockout rose

For knockout roses you should start by digging a hole that is twice as wide and as deep as the root ball. With a Shovel Work the soil at the bottom of the hole so that it loosen and aerate.

Mix compost or Potting Mix with the soil you have removed from the hole. Then fill back the hole until you have a hole the same size as the container the roses come in. Then plant rose at the same depth as it was in the container, for good growth Space Knockout rose plants 3 feet apart.

How to fertilize knockout roses:

knockout rose

Knockout Roses need to be fertilized once a month. Try using an Organic Fertilizer rather than synthetic fertilizers, because Synthetic fertilizers can make your rose have more foliage and fewer flowers.

For the next couple of weeks after planting, frequently check on your plant. Water as needed to help the plant stay healthy. Add some mulch around the plant to help retain the moister and stop weeds from competing with the plant.


When to Plant Knockout Roses

knockout rose

Knockout Roses are a less susceptible to diseases variety of roses, bred by William Radler. you can successfully plant them in the U.S. in zones 5 through 11.

The best time to start planting Knockout Roses is in the fall or in the early spring.

You can grow knock out roses in either pots, or in garden beds. Avoid planting knock out roses in frozen ground.

Knockout Roses reach a maturity three years after planting. You should avoid pruning knock out roses during the first three years of growth, because this may reduce the size of the plant after maturing.

Try to plant knockout roses at the same depth it was growing in the nursery container, this well help reduce the stress on the stem and root system.

When planting set the bare root so that roots are spread over a mound of soil and try covering them thoroughly.